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The Monsters & the Critics

To borrow a title from Tolkien. Here's some of the nice things people have said about my work. For the rest, I will refer you to Eugene O'Neill: "I love every bone in their heads."



About Penny Dreadful #9:
"...G. W. Thomas ON THE FEAST OF STEPHEN provides a short story that engrosses you from the first few words. Unable to turn away from the tale, knowing that it will end in an horrific manner, does not detract from the power of the writing and the wish for a happier ending..."
                                                                                                    New Hope International (UK)


About Penny Dreadful #10:
"...On the plus side I thought LONG DESIRED AND LONG DELAYED by G.W.Thomas was a reasonable alternative take on a very famous story - but to disclose more would spoil the fun."
                                                                                                   New Hope International (UK)


About "The Songs of Madness" chapbook:

This collection of exclusively Mythos stories is a very inspired one, many of the stories exhibiting a craft and ease of style
usually somewhat lacking in the work of others. That is not to say, however, that they are all wholly original, for some of these
stories seem more like tributes to the Mythos than actual stories:

"There Was An Old Lady" is a strange piece, owing an obvious, if unexpected debt, to Mother Goose nursery rhymes,
while "The Man Who Would Be King" follows in the footsteps of the Maine Man -- successfully wedding King's themes to the
Master, HPL's. Yet the WAY they emulate their models, especially in the former, is ingenious!

Some of the stories are a little weak, perhaps: "The Other Woman" is amusing but a bit overlong and "The People" doesn't
really seem to go anywhere.

But two of the stories certainly stand out: "The Court of Two Lions," is an Arkham ghost/paranoia/elder race tale worthy
of Lovecraft himself! "The Songs of Madness" is also rich in detail and enthralling and very cosmically Lovecraftian as well!
These two stories alone are worth the price of the book, with the others just icing on the cake (or, ichor on the altar, if you
like)!
                                                                                                                                -- James Ambuehl



About "Ghoultide Greetings" chapbook:

This, too, is a very worthwhile collection of Christmas horror-theme tales (twelve tales!) -- less Lovecraftian in content
and leaning more towards the M.R. James ghost story school -- but worthwhile nevertheless.

Of course, there ARE two Cthulhoid stories herein: "The Drawer" concerns itself with that time-honored theme, revenge
from beyond the grave and "A Thousand Cuts, A Thousand Deaths" is a grisly little affair concerning criticism taken to the utmost (which reminds me: I hope publisher Thomas likes my overview . . . if not, I SHUDDER to think of the consequences!)

Also very impressive is the creepy-crawly "The Ornament," the grotesquely comical "The Suit," and the hauntingly
beautiful "The Green Man" and "And No Bird Sings."

But really, all the stories are interesting, an I await more work from Thomas with open tentacles!

                                                                                                                                  -- James Ambuehl



About The Horror Gamer chapbook:

Like most of Chuck's publications thus far, this booklet is solely written by Gary Thomas, head honcho of C.E.P. It's a
collection of scenarios and articles for use with Call of Cthulhu. Thomas seems to have a real fascination with the works of the
early writers of the supernatural -- M.R. James, A. Merritt, Edgar Rice Burroughs, and so on -- and the works of Robert E.
Howard. "The Conqueror Worm" is an especially intriguing scenario in which the investigators team up with King Kull against
the Great Old One Gol-Goroth! In addition, there are articles on The Children of the Night in REH's works, the arcane
volumes of M.R. James, killer plants, psychic detectives, stonehenge, and a whole lot more!

                                                                                                                                -- James Ambuehl



About Elder Signs chapbook anthology:

Just recently released, this is a fine anthology of Cthulhu Mythos fiction -- and its versatility in theme illustrates to good
effect the versatility yet inherent in the Mythos tapestry at large!

"If You Go Down to the Woods Today . . ." by Per J. Okerstrom and Chuck's editor/publisher Thomas would have
found itself at home in the upcoming Delta Green fiction anthology Alien Intelligence, from Pagan Publishing, with its
technological horror theme of Men-In-Black and things far worse waiting in the wings -- as perhaps could have Tim Jones'
Cyber-Cthulhoid "The Temple in the Matrix," as well.

On the more traditional side of the Mythos (some would call it "pulp") we have my own "The Horror That Came to
Innsmouth," a look at the Innsmouth Raid of 1928 from a different point-of-view than the human, and Jeremy E. Johnson's "The
Isle of Cthulhu," a semi-sequel to HPL's "The Call of Cthulhu."

Also worth mentioning are Nightscapes's editor, Paul Berglund's "The Crystal," a very cosmically-flavored Severn Valley
tale, and probably the first legitimately Cthulhoid tale I've seen by D. F. Lewis -- the genuinely scary "Bobtail"! The remaining
two stories by C.L. Werner and Jack L. Thomas were not bad either for first efforts, but very obviously first efforts.

                                                                                                                                -- James Ambuehl



From Scavenger's Newsletter #165
"This charming, often wry and frequently thoughtful little collection of fables[The Rainbow Man] recount over 2 dozen of the title character's experiences...It's a sweet, but wistful and highly readable collection."
                                                                                                              Jim Lee


From Scavenger's Newsletter #175
"...But the better Lovecraft pastiche here ["There Was An Old Lady"] is probably the one by G. W. Thomas, where a carny recruiter blunders into the "hills west of Arkham" and ends up dictating an audio cassette account of his nightmare adventure just before...well, before  the expected (yet fairly effective) ending."
                                                                                                              Jim Lee


About "The Colloquoy of Demoiselle & Hastur" and "Black Sun":

"...I'd like to say that I've enjoyed what you have written for IMELOD, my favorite being "The Colloquoy of Demoiselle and Hastur" and "Black Sun" (in The Ancient Track), the latter a "fanzine" tour de force..."
                                                                                                -- Keith (fan)



About "PennyEyes":

"Stumbled upon your site [PULP&DAGGER], and was plenty entertained. I just read the story, PENNYEYES. I am  a big fan of apocalyptic stories, from Mad Max to Thundarr the Barbarian. I was VERY impressed by this story. Mr. Thomas is truly one of the masters! My only gripe is that I WANT more! GET THOMAS TO DO A SEQUEL OR AT LEAST ANOTHER STORY SET IN THAT SAME "UNIVERSE".

 "I was on the edge of my seat the whole way. I felt the suspense, the horror, in my very bones as the survivors struggled for their lives against the old man and his legion of monstrosities. I also felt the background was very clever. Watch out for those  "gateways". Now I know the world can end in more ways than just the same old atomic bomb and meteor strike."

                                                                                                        --  Chad (fan)



About the Rainbow Man:

"Just finished reading the Rainbow Man stories at Fables.  Very solid and entertaining work.  They had that fable "feel" to them
that I believe Megan is going for.  I look forward to reading more of your work; I hope there are more Rainbow Man stories!"
                                                                                                                            -- Shawn James



About the Jessie Roland Stories:

"I'm glad to be able to comment on this one ["The Pail"]. I give it a 5. It is interesting how the murderer and the method are figured out, but what I most enjoy is that the story is well-crafted."

["The Judas Gift"] "There's 'getting rid of somebody' and then there's 'GETTING RID OF  SOMEBODY'.  This is absolutely diabolical. I love these Jessie Roland stories. This is a character that you get to know so well, that it isn't like reading a story about something or someone. It is like observing occurrences, or overhearing conversations -- living the events. This story is a 5.0, and I can only hope there are many, many more adventures of Jessie's that I would be allowed to share and tag along on!"

                                                                                                                                -- J F Juzwik



About "Claymore For Dragon":

"Also good on the 2002 post [Pegasus Online] is "A Claymore for Dragon" by G. W. Thomas, a rough but inventive dragon story from a cool POV."
                                                                                                                        -- SFReader.com



About "The Seceret" in Nemonyous 2:

"The secret: Stylish. Quick, as much of the content is dialogue. Interesting rather than satisfying it does nevertheless leave an impression because it is told so well. Sophisticated I expect, with a fine line in amusement and philosophy." -- Mick Sims

""The Secret" is fresh and funny -- I laughed out loud at the idea of fashion statements in a fantasy setting. "Muura," the wizard asks, "what is the meaning of this -- coiffure?" The assistant's response is: "Everybody's wearing their hair like this." You can take the fantasy out of fashion, but you can't take the fashion out of fantasy, it seems! This story, while surely qualifying as an example of bathos, might also be a toney way of getting the author's personal opinions across via the conversation between the two interlocutors. And on a personal level of my own, I was intrigued by the mention of Rainbow Man. Is the author a Pogues fan?"  -- David Mathew (Infinity Plus)



About Prairie Cemtery:

"... Witty, insightful and often surprising, a real gem of a collection." -- Mind Like Water

"An interesting collection of poems and some like a wasp, have a sting in the tail. Described as horror poetry it is for the most part horror of a psychological form - leaving the readers imagination to trigger the spine chill..."
                                                                                                                -- David Parkinson



About "In Line":

"'In-Line' by G. W. Thomas is one of the most perfect short-shorts I have ever read."
                                                                       -- Chab Cottle, Editor Titanzine


Baryon Magazine #90

Cemetery Poets: GRAVE OFFERINGS, edited by Peggy Jo Shumate, $4.99 various formats, 210 pages, ISBN: 1554040183, www.double-dragon-ebooks.com, reviewed by Barry Hunter.

Iíve always considered poetry to be word pictures. They can also be considered as extremely short stories that tell a vivid picture in a few words. Here is a collection of all types of poems: short ones, long ones, rhyming ones, and prose ones. It is also a collection of vivid images brought on by the words. They range from the pits of hell to the tips of our tongues. They share their thoughts and as you think of some of them, you wonder if they might be your thoughts as well.

Talented writers David Bowlin, Peggy Jo Shumate, Megan Powell, Scott Urban, Paul Kane, Matt Hewitt, G.W. Thomas, C. Lynn Young and others take you on a tour that ranges from the soul to the grave with all points in between. I believe that there is a hardcover version forthcoming as well. You might want to pick it up as well and place it on the poetry shelve between Lovecraft and Poe.
 



THE AUTOPSY TABLE Website:

In the past few days I've been reading G.W. Thomas' The Book of the Black Sun. It's a collection of his short-shorts and short stories. Very good stuff. I'm 3/4 of the way through the book and I've not read a lamer yet.

Susanne
-



"Such Bitter Business," by G. W. Thomas, follows a book collector after a rare book. This book is an evil magic book, and this book collector carries a gun, knows magic, and is pursuing an alien slug-creature that can take over bodies. Does this sound weird to you? It is, but believe it or not, it works. Thomas blends healthy doses of horror, fantasy, sci-fi, mystery, and thriller together to make a fascinating read. This has the flair and feel of detective noir, right down to the first-person narration. Thomas provides enough detail to let the reader know what's going on, but resists putting in so much that the story drags. A great balance of genres so smooth you'd think it happens all the time, Thomas provides something unique and original. Read this story; it's my second-favorite in the anthology. -- Dennis Kriesel (SF Reader)

"G.W Thomas' Such Bitter Business is a gritty-styled chase to recover a book stolen by a body-snatching parasite. Itís an interesting ride along with the book collector, and a fun, rounded story." -- Dark Fire (Karonda Barker)



From The DreamForge
 

Review by Nancy Jackson
The Ghostbreakers: New Horrors
Edited by G.W. Thomas Cyber Pulp -- Ebook $ 4.99

Take several talented authors, a well-known editor, fourteen original stories, and one incredible theme and you get Ghostbreakers:New Horrors. If you arenít very familiar with the term Ghostbreakers, there is a well-defined explanation about them and the different identities they can take in the introduction. I appreciate the insight a reader is given on a subject they may not be familiar with; it brings validity to the book. You are also given a link to a list that boasts over 160 different Ghostbreakers to date. Most names you will recognize such as Van Helsing, Doctor Who, Lovecraft, and some will be new or surprising -- but trust me when I say this complete package makes for an intriguing read.
 

 I thoroughly enjoyed each and every story in here and was thrilled to see a varied amount of plots, characters, and settings. No two stories were alike, and each author brought their own style and personality. Fans of the occult, detectives, crime, mystery, and thrillers will enjoy immensely...ďBody of WorkĒ written by G.W. Thomas has a smooth flow, sharp wit and dialogue, his style of writing is very down-to-earth and intelligent. It shows he is quite a fan of Ghostbreakers and it comes across in his method of suspense and facts. I think if anything he brings a voice of wisdom into this collection, that stands out from any other.... Currently it is available as an ebook in multiple formats, however it will be available as a trade paperback in the near future. There are new collections surrounding the Ghostbreakers such as Sinister Sleuths and Vampire Hunters on the way as well, and no doubt they will be every bit as exciting and smart as this one was. G.W. Thomas has started a wonderful trend by bringing back the beloved tales of the old with styles of the new, allowing for a whole new generation to enjoy.



Black October Magazine #3:

"G.W. Thomas writes an engaging historical essay about the evolution of the psychic detective in literature" -- Joshua Rountree



Cemetery Poets:

"Iíve always considered poems to be word pictures. They can also be considered as extremely short stories that tell a vivid picture in a few words. Here is a collection of all types of poems: short ones, long ones, rhyming ones, and prose ones. It is also a collection of vivid images brought on by the words. They range from the pits of hell to the tips of our tongues. They share their thoughts and as you think of some of them, you wonder if they might be your thoughts as well.

Talented writers David Bowlin, Peggy Jo Shumate, Megan Powell, Scott Urban, Paul Kane, Matt Hewitt, G.W. Thomas, C. Lynn Young, and others take you on a tour that ranges from the soul to the grave with all points in between. I believe that there is a hardcover version forthcoming as well. You might want to pick it up as well and place it on the poetry shelf between Lovecraft and Poe." -- Barry Hunter in Baryon 90


"In Line":

"In-Line by G. W. Thomas is one of the most perfect short-shorts I have ever read..." -- Chad Cottle, editor of Titanzine
 

Copyright 2004 G. W. Thomas
 
 


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